Dispositional Attribution

In simple words, Attribution refers to explanation of behaviors whether others or our own. It is an important aspect of social psychology. Different psychologists have come up with different theories or models of attribution over the years.

[Related Reading: Attribution Theory]

What remains constant is that all of the theories revolve around two core types of attribution. They are:

Situational Attribution

In simple words, Attribution refers to explanation of behaviors whether others or our own. It is an important aspect of social psychology. Different psychologists have come up with different theories or models of attribution over the years.

[Related ReadingAttribution Theory]

What remains constant is that all of the theories revolve around two core types of attribution. They are:

Weiner Attribution Theory

Attribution theory was first developed by Fritz Heider in 1958. But, it was not able to cover every aspect and various different attribution theories were developed. Bernard Weiner, of the University of California at Los Angeles, developed what is now one of the popular theories of attribution.

Covariation Model

Covariation Model is an attribution theory in which a person tries to explain others' or her certain behavior through multiple observations. It deals with both social perception and self-perception of the person. It was proposed by Harold Kelley.

It states

Correspondent Inference Theory

This theory was formulated by Edward E. Jones and Keith Davis in 1965, which accounts for a person's inferences about an individual's certain behavior or action. The major purpose of this theory is to try and explain why people make internal or external attributions.

Internal or Dispositional attribution is more focused in this theory. In fact, situational or external causes of any actions are not dealt here.

Attribution Theory

“Attribution theory deals with how the social perceiver uses information to arrive at causal explanations for events.  It examines what information is gathered and how it is combined to form a causal judgment” (Fiske, & Taylor, 1991)

Conditional Positive Regard

Conditional Positive Regard is exactly opposite to Unconditional Positive Regard (UPR). In simple words, it can be defined as the acknowledgement and/or respect demonstrated towards someone in a conditional way. There are no restrictions as in the UPR.

Unconditional Positive Regard

It’s a concept developed by the psychologist Carl Rogers. Rogers believed that complete, indefinite acceptance and positive regard was the key to any successful therapy, which he termed as Unconditional Positive Regard.

According to Rogers,

Client Centered Therapy (Person Centered Therapy)

Client Centered Therapy is a form of talk therapy developed by the psychologist Carl Rogers during the 1940s and the 50s. At present, it’s one of the most popular approaches in psychotherapy. It’s a non-directive therapy which is also referred to as Person Centered Therapy. Another name given to the therapy is Rogerian therapy, after the name of the psychologist.

Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory

The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory is also called MMPI-2. It’s the most popular clinical assessment tool used by psychologists and psychiatrists at present. The tool was first developed in late 1930s by psychiatrist J.C. McKinley and Starke R. Hathaway at the University of Minnesota, hence the term, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory.

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