Problem Solving Strategies

Problem solving is something that we go through on a daily basis. As problems never end, the need to solve them is also everlasting. From managing your books properly on a shelf to deciding the next step for your career, the problems can be small or big but they need to be solved on daily basis.

Psychological Steps Involved in Problem Solving

A mental process or a phenomenon dedicated towards solving problems by discovering and analyzing the problem is referred to as problem-solving. It is a process dedicated to finding not just any solution, but the best solution to resolve any problems. There is no such thing as one best way to solve every kind of problem, since there are unique problems depending upon the situation there are unique solutions too.

Arousal Theory of Motivation

Motivation can be defined as a reason (or reasons) which lead an individual to act in a certain way. The reasons might not always be the same between two individuals acting in a certain way, but almost every action is directed by certain motivation. Different theories have been proposed over the years to explain motivation, one of which is Arousal Theory of Motivation.

False Memories

Fabricated or distorted recollection of an event is referred to as false memory. Contrary to the popular belief, memory is not a video recorder that constantly, accurately records and stores the incidents in our life. The truth is, memory is very much prone to distortion. It’s not unusual for people to be 100% sure about their certain recollection of an event even when they are wrong.

Motivated Forgetting

Motivated forgetting is a theorized psychological behavior in which people may forget unwanted memories, either consciously or unconsciously.

Although it might get confusing for some, it’s completely different from defense mechanism. Motivated forgetting is also defined as a form of conscious coping strategy.

Ebbinghaus Forgetting Curve

Ebbinghaus forgetting curve describes the decrease in ability of the brain to retain memory over time. The issue was hypothesized by Hermann Ebbinghaus in 1885, which is why it’s called Ebbinghaus forgetting curve.

Proactive and Retroactive Interference

Interference theory refers to the occurrence of interaction between new learned material and past behavior, memories or thoughts that cause disturbance in retrieval of the memory. Based on the disturbance caused in attempts to retrieve past or latest memories, interference have been classified into two different kinds.

Retroactive Interference

The form of interference where new memories restrain the capacity to old information is called Retroactive Interference. The idea of retroactive interference is not at all uncommon. In fact, this has happened to everyone in different times in life. A simple example for this kind of interference would be when trying to learn two different things.

Proactive Interference

The form of interference where old memories restrain the capacity to remember new information is called Proactive Interference. The idea of proactive interference is not at all uncommon. In fact, this has happened to everyone in different times in life. A simple example for this kind of interference would be when trying to learn two different things.

Seven Sins of Memory

The Seven Sins of Memory: How the Mind Forgets and Remembers is a book by Daniel Schacter, a longtime memory researcher, PhD, and chairperson of Harvard University’s psychology department.

Memory, for all that it does for us every day...for all the feats that can sometimes amaze us, can also be a troublemaker. – Schacter, regarding his book

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